Qatar World Cup To Be Most Expensive Ever

Fans are accusing FIFA of pricing them out.

Football fan groups across Europe are accusing FIFA of "hammering" supporters by hiking ticket prices in the "most expensive World Cup" ever.


The world football governing body released ticket information for the tournament in Qatar, which begins on November 21.


The cost of attending the World Cup final is up to 46 per cent higher in Qatar than the previous tournament in Russia.


The most expensive tickets on general sale for the December 18 final at Lusail Stadium are 5,850 Qatari riyals ($1,607), up 46% from the $1,099 for the 2018 final won by France.


Supporters hoping to follow their team throughout the finals in the Middle East, will also face increased costs after FIFA cut the number of tickets available in cheaper categories throughout the tournament.


The announcement drew an immediate and dismayed response from Football Supporters Europe, an umbrella group for fans across Europe.

The tickets are divided into four categories.


The fourth category is the cheapest and only available to Qatari residents. They'll cost $11, which is about the daily wage for a migrant worker who helped build the stadiums and infrastructure for the controversial event.


Here's how the range of ticket prices vary for international fans, compared to the cost in Russia in 2018 (in brackets):


Opening match: $618 ($550), $440 ($390), $302 ($220). Other group-stage games: $220 ($210), $165 ($165), $69 ($105). Last 16: $275 ($245), $206 ($185), $96 ($115). Quarterfinals: $426 ($365), $288 ($255), $206 ($175). Semifinals: $956 ($750), $659 ($480), $357 ($285). Third place: $426 ($365), $302 ($255), $206 ($175). Final: $1,607 ($1,100), $1,003 ($710), $604 ($455).


The cheapest tickets for foreign visitors are in category three.

A random draw notifying supporters if they can even get tickets will take place at the end of the first application phase - which runs through February 8. Notifications will come by March 8.


So far though, just 13 of the 32 World Cup spots have been filled, with qualifying not set to conclude until June.

The draw for the tournament is scheduled for April 1 in Doha.


The launch of ticket sales will be the first gauge of interest in attending arguably the most controversial tournament since the World Cup was first staged in 1930.


Some fans could boycott the World Cup after controversy over how Qatar came to be hosts of the tournament. There's also been a decade of criticism of the country's treatment of migrant workers, who have been relied on to build up the stadiums and other infrastructure.


France and Manchester United legend Eric Cantona has already said he won't watch the tournament because of human rights abuse reports.


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